Which Is the best indicator of muscle oxygen extraction during exercise using NIRS? Evidence that HHb is not the candidate

Ryotaro Kime, Masako Fujioka, Takuya Osawa, Shun Takagi, Masatsugu Niwayama, Yasuhisa Kaneko, Takuya Osada, Norio Murase, Toshihito Katsumura

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Recently, deoxygenated hemoglobin (HHb) has been used as one of the most popular indicators of muscle O<inf>2</inf> extraction during exercise in the field of exercise physiology. However, HHb may not sufficiently represent muscle O<inf>2</inf> extraction, as total hemoglobin (tHb) is not stable during exercise. The purpose of this study was to measure various muscle oxygenation signals during cycle exercise and clarify which is the best indicator of muscle O<inf>2</inf> extraction during exercise using NIRS. Ten healthy men performed 6-min cycle exercise at both moderate and heavy work rates. Oxygenated hemoglobin (O<inf>2</inf>-Hb), HHb, tHb, and muscle tissue oxygen saturation (SmO<inf>2</inf>) were measured with near-infrared spatial resolved spectroscopy from the vastus lateralis muscle. Skin blood flow (sBF) was also monitored at a site close to the NIRS probe. During moderate exercise, tHb, O<inf>2</inf>-Hb, and SmO<inf>2</inf> displayed progressive increases until the end of exercise. In contrast, HHb remained stable during moderate work rate. sBF remained stable during moderate exercise but showed a progressive decrease at heavy work rate. These results provide evidence that HHb may not sufficiently represent muscle O<inf>2</inf> extraction since tHb is not stable during exercise and HHb is insensitive to exercise-induced hyperaemia.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationAdvances in Experimental Medicine and Biology
PublisherSpringer New York LLC
Pages163-169
Number of pages7
Volume789
ISBN (Print)9781461472568
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013
Externally publishedYes

Publication series

NameAdvances in Experimental Medicine and Biology
Volume789
ISSN (Print)00652598

Fingerprint

Muscle
Exercise
Hemoglobins
Oxygen
Muscles
Skin
Blood
Oxygenation
Physiology
Spectroscopy
Quadriceps Muscle
Hyperemia
Tissue
Infrared radiation
Spectrum Analysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Kime, R., Fujioka, M., Osawa, T., Takagi, S., Niwayama, M., Kaneko, Y., ... Katsumura, T. (2013). Which Is the best indicator of muscle oxygen extraction during exercise using NIRS? Evidence that HHb is not the candidate. In Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology (Vol. 789, pp. 163-169). (Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology; Vol. 789). Springer New York LLC. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-7411-1_23

Which Is the best indicator of muscle oxygen extraction during exercise using NIRS? Evidence that HHb is not the candidate. / Kime, Ryotaro; Fujioka, Masako; Osawa, Takuya; Takagi, Shun; Niwayama, Masatsugu; Kaneko, Yasuhisa; Osada, Takuya; Murase, Norio; Katsumura, Toshihito.

Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology. Vol. 789 Springer New York LLC, 2013. p. 163-169 (Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology; Vol. 789).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Kime, R, Fujioka, M, Osawa, T, Takagi, S, Niwayama, M, Kaneko, Y, Osada, T, Murase, N & Katsumura, T 2013, Which Is the best indicator of muscle oxygen extraction during exercise using NIRS? Evidence that HHb is not the candidate. in Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology. vol. 789, Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology, vol. 789, Springer New York LLC, pp. 163-169. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-7411-1_23
Kime R, Fujioka M, Osawa T, Takagi S, Niwayama M, Kaneko Y et al. Which Is the best indicator of muscle oxygen extraction during exercise using NIRS? Evidence that HHb is not the candidate. In Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology. Vol. 789. Springer New York LLC. 2013. p. 163-169. (Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-7411-1_23
Kime, Ryotaro ; Fujioka, Masako ; Osawa, Takuya ; Takagi, Shun ; Niwayama, Masatsugu ; Kaneko, Yasuhisa ; Osada, Takuya ; Murase, Norio ; Katsumura, Toshihito. / Which Is the best indicator of muscle oxygen extraction during exercise using NIRS? Evidence that HHb is not the candidate. Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology. Vol. 789 Springer New York LLC, 2013. pp. 163-169 (Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology).
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