Who gets the information about genetic testing for cancer risk? The role of race/ethnicity, immigration status, and primary care clinicians

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study identified factors associated with awareness of genetic testing for cancer risk in the US general population. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to analyze data from the 2000 National Health Interview Survey. The strong predictors were education, race/ethnicity, immigration status, health status, interaction with health professionals, controlling for socioeconomic status, cancer diagnosis, family history of cancer, and perceived personal cancer risk. The substantial lack of awareness of genetic testing among immigrant and ethnic populations warrants further research and tailored educational interventions. Ways to improve quality of patient interactions with non-genetic clinicians in promoting public knowledge of genetic testing for cancer risk are also worthy of further exploration.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)131-136
Number of pages6
JournalClinical Genetics
Volume64
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2003 Aug 1
Externally publishedYes

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Emigration and Immigration
Genetic Testing
Primary Health Care
Neoplasms
Health Surveys
Social Class
Population
Health Status
Logistic Models
Regression Analysis
Interviews
Education
Health
Research

Keywords

  • Awareness
  • Cancer
  • Communication
  • Genetic predisposition testing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics(clinical)
  • Genetics

Cite this

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abstract = "This study identified factors associated with awareness of genetic testing for cancer risk in the US general population. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to analyze data from the 2000 National Health Interview Survey. The strong predictors were education, race/ethnicity, immigration status, health status, interaction with health professionals, controlling for socioeconomic status, cancer diagnosis, family history of cancer, and perceived personal cancer risk. The substantial lack of awareness of genetic testing among immigrant and ethnic populations warrants further research and tailored educational interventions. Ways to improve quality of patient interactions with non-genetic clinicians in promoting public knowledge of genetic testing for cancer risk are also worthy of further exploration.",
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