Wired and Wireless Links to Bridge Networks: Seamlessly Connecting Radio and Optical Technologies for 5G Networks

Tetsuya Kawanishi, Atsushi Kanno, Hugo S.C. Freire

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    14 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    As fifth-generation (5G) technology is expected to offer super-broadband mobile services with new features such as low latency for critical applications and low-power operation for Internet of Things (IoT) applications, it will use wireless interfaces for small or spot cells with a new RF resource, the high band (frequencies above 6 GHz), in addition to the low band (below 6 GHz) on macro and small cells coexisting with conventional mobile technologies [1]-[4]. Another feature of 5G wireless interfaces is more precise control of radio waves in space division through the use of multi-antenna technologies, such as massive multiple-input/multiple-output (MIMO) or beamforming [5].

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)102-111
    Number of pages10
    JournalIEEE Microwave Magazine
    Volume19
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2018 May 1

    Fingerprint

    Telecommunication links
    MIMO (control systems)
    radio waves
    beamforming
    cells
    division
    resources
    Radio waves
    antennas
    Beamforming
    broadband
    Frequency bands
    Macros
    Antennas
    Internet of things

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Radiation
    • Condensed Matter Physics
    • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

    Cite this

    Wired and Wireless Links to Bridge Networks : Seamlessly Connecting Radio and Optical Technologies for 5G Networks. / Kawanishi, Tetsuya; Kanno, Atsushi; Freire, Hugo S.C.

    In: IEEE Microwave Magazine, Vol. 19, No. 3, 01.05.2018, p. 102-111.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    @article{b70920ebd97c4aca83cb0e22258abc21,
    title = "Wired and Wireless Links to Bridge Networks: Seamlessly Connecting Radio and Optical Technologies for 5G Networks",
    abstract = "As fifth-generation (5G) technology is expected to offer super-broadband mobile services with new features such as low latency for critical applications and low-power operation for Internet of Things (IoT) applications, it will use wireless interfaces for small or spot cells with a new RF resource, the high band (frequencies above 6 GHz), in addition to the low band (below 6 GHz) on macro and small cells coexisting with conventional mobile technologies [1]-[4]. Another feature of 5G wireless interfaces is more precise control of radio waves in space division through the use of multi-antenna technologies, such as massive multiple-input/multiple-output (MIMO) or beamforming [5].",
    author = "Tetsuya Kawanishi and Atsushi Kanno and Freire, {Hugo S.C.}",
    year = "2018",
    month = "5",
    day = "1",
    doi = "10.1109/MMM.2018.2801638",
    language = "English",
    volume = "19",
    pages = "102--111",
    journal = "IEEE Microwave Magazine",
    issn = "1527-3342",
    publisher = "Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.",
    number = "3",

    }

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Wired and Wireless Links to Bridge Networks

    T2 - Seamlessly Connecting Radio and Optical Technologies for 5G Networks

    AU - Kawanishi, Tetsuya

    AU - Kanno, Atsushi

    AU - Freire, Hugo S.C.

    PY - 2018/5/1

    Y1 - 2018/5/1

    N2 - As fifth-generation (5G) technology is expected to offer super-broadband mobile services with new features such as low latency for critical applications and low-power operation for Internet of Things (IoT) applications, it will use wireless interfaces for small or spot cells with a new RF resource, the high band (frequencies above 6 GHz), in addition to the low band (below 6 GHz) on macro and small cells coexisting with conventional mobile technologies [1]-[4]. Another feature of 5G wireless interfaces is more precise control of radio waves in space division through the use of multi-antenna technologies, such as massive multiple-input/multiple-output (MIMO) or beamforming [5].

    AB - As fifth-generation (5G) technology is expected to offer super-broadband mobile services with new features such as low latency for critical applications and low-power operation for Internet of Things (IoT) applications, it will use wireless interfaces for small or spot cells with a new RF resource, the high band (frequencies above 6 GHz), in addition to the low band (below 6 GHz) on macro and small cells coexisting with conventional mobile technologies [1]-[4]. Another feature of 5G wireless interfaces is more precise control of radio waves in space division through the use of multi-antenna technologies, such as massive multiple-input/multiple-output (MIMO) or beamforming [5].

    UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85045125679&partnerID=8YFLogxK

    UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85045125679&partnerID=8YFLogxK

    U2 - 10.1109/MMM.2018.2801638

    DO - 10.1109/MMM.2018.2801638

    M3 - Article

    AN - SCOPUS:85045125679

    VL - 19

    SP - 102

    EP - 111

    JO - IEEE Microwave Magazine

    JF - IEEE Microwave Magazine

    SN - 1527-3342

    IS - 3

    ER -