Workplace neighbourhood built-environment attributes and sitting at work and for transport among Japanese desk-based workers

Chien Yu Lin*, Mohammad Javad Koohsari, Yung Liao, Kaori Ishii, Ai Shibata, Tomoki Nakaya, Gavin R. McCormack, Nyssa Hadgraft, Takemi Sugiyama, Neville Owen, Koichiro Oka

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Workplace settings—both internal and external—can influence how workers are physically active or sedentary. Although research has identified some indoor environmental attributes associated with sitting at work, few studies have examined associations of workplace neighbourhood built-environment attributes with workplace sitting time. We examined the cross-sectional associations of perceived and objective workplace neighbourhood built-environment attributes with sitting time at work and for transport among desk-based workers in Japan. Data were collected from a nationwide online survey. The Abbreviated Neighborhood Environment Walkability Scale (n = 2137) and Walk Score® (for a subsample of participants; n = 1163) were used to assess perceived and objective built-environment attributes of workplace neighbourhoods. Self-reported daily average sitting time at work, in cars and in public transport was measured using a Japanese validated questionnaire. Linear regression models estimated the associations of workplace neighbourhood built-environment attributes with sitting time. All perceived workplace neighbourhood built-environment attributes were positively correlated with Walk Score®. However, statistically significant associations with Walk Score® were found for sitting for transport but not for sitting at work. Workers who perceived their workplace neighbourhoods to be more walkable reported a longer time sitting at work and in public transport but a shorter sitting time in cars. Our findings suggest that walkable workplace neighbourhoods may discourage longer car use but have workplaces where workers spend a long time sitting at work. The latter finding further suggests that there may be missed opportunities for desk-based workers to reduce sitting time. Future workplace interventions to reduce sitting time may be developed, taking advantage of the opportunities to take time away from work in workplace neighbourhoods.

Original languageEnglish
Article number195
JournalScientific reports
Volume12
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2022 Dec

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

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