Younger people, and stronger effects of all-or-nothing thoughts on aggression: Moderating effects of age on the relationships between dichotomous thinking and aggression

Atsushi Oshio, Takahiro Mieda, Kanako Taku

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Binary or dichotomous thinking may lead to aggression throughout people’s lifespan; additionally, relationships are likely to be affected by types of aggression (i.e. physical aggression, verbal aggression, anger, and hostility) as well as gender and age. Using large-scale data (N = 2,315), the current study tested if age or gender moderated dichotomous thinking’s correlation with four different types of aggression. Participants (Mage = 36.1, SD = 16.2, range = 18–69) completed the Dichotomous Thinking Inventory and the Buss-Perry Aggression Questionnaire. Dichotomous thinking differentially affected aggression depending on participants’ age: dichotomous thinking and aggression were more strongly correlated in younger participants. Individuals’ tendency to think dichotomously appeared relatively stable; however, age appeared to moderate dichotomous thinking’s effects.

Original languageEnglish
Article number1244874
JournalCogent Psychology
Volume3
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016 Dec 31

Keywords

  • age differences
  • aggression
  • dichotomous thinking
  • gender differences

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Younger people, and stronger effects of all-or-nothing thoughts on aggression: Moderating effects of age on the relationships between dichotomous thinking and aggression'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this