Younger people, and stronger effects of all-or-nothing thoughts on aggression: Moderating effects of age on the relationships between dichotomous thinking and aggression

Atsushi Oshio, Takahiro Mieda, Kanako Taku

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Binary or dichotomous thinking may lead to aggression throughout people’s lifespan; additionally, relationships are likely to be affected by types of aggression (i.e. physical aggression, verbal aggression, anger, and hostility) as well as gender and age. Using large-scale data (N = 2,315), the current study tested if age or gender moderated dichotomous thinking’s correlation with four different types of aggression. Participants (Mage = 36.1, SD = 16.2, range = 18–69) completed the Dichotomous Thinking Inventory and the Buss-Perry Aggression Questionnaire. Dichotomous thinking differentially affected aggression depending on participants’ age: dichotomous thinking and aggression were more strongly correlated in younger participants. Individuals’ tendency to think dichotomously appeared relatively stable; however, age appeared to moderate dichotomous thinking’s effects.

Original languageEnglish
Article number1244874
JournalCogent Psychology
Volume3
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016 Dec 31

Fingerprint

Aggression
Hostility
Anger
Equipment and Supplies

Keywords

  • age differences
  • aggression
  • dichotomous thinking
  • gender differences

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

@article{a4f858a5bb3d4dbda2af32c9f8e8c212,
title = "Younger people, and stronger effects of all-or-nothing thoughts on aggression: Moderating effects of age on the relationships between dichotomous thinking and aggression",
abstract = "Binary or dichotomous thinking may lead to aggression throughout people’s lifespan; additionally, relationships are likely to be affected by types of aggression (i.e. physical aggression, verbal aggression, anger, and hostility) as well as gender and age. Using large-scale data (N = 2,315), the current study tested if age or gender moderated dichotomous thinking’s correlation with four different types of aggression. Participants (Mage = 36.1, SD = 16.2, range = 18–69) completed the Dichotomous Thinking Inventory and the Buss-Perry Aggression Questionnaire. Dichotomous thinking differentially affected aggression depending on participants’ age: dichotomous thinking and aggression were more strongly correlated in younger participants. Individuals’ tendency to think dichotomously appeared relatively stable; however, age appeared to moderate dichotomous thinking’s effects.",
keywords = "age differences, aggression, dichotomous thinking, gender differences",
author = "Atsushi Oshio and Takahiro Mieda and Kanako Taku",
year = "2016",
month = "12",
day = "31",
doi = "10.1080/23311908.2016.1244874",
language = "English",
volume = "3",
journal = "Cogent Psychology",
issn = "2331-1908",
publisher = "Cogent OA",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Younger people, and stronger effects of all-or-nothing thoughts on aggression

T2 - Moderating effects of age on the relationships between dichotomous thinking and aggression

AU - Oshio, Atsushi

AU - Mieda, Takahiro

AU - Taku, Kanako

PY - 2016/12/31

Y1 - 2016/12/31

N2 - Binary or dichotomous thinking may lead to aggression throughout people’s lifespan; additionally, relationships are likely to be affected by types of aggression (i.e. physical aggression, verbal aggression, anger, and hostility) as well as gender and age. Using large-scale data (N = 2,315), the current study tested if age or gender moderated dichotomous thinking’s correlation with four different types of aggression. Participants (Mage = 36.1, SD = 16.2, range = 18–69) completed the Dichotomous Thinking Inventory and the Buss-Perry Aggression Questionnaire. Dichotomous thinking differentially affected aggression depending on participants’ age: dichotomous thinking and aggression were more strongly correlated in younger participants. Individuals’ tendency to think dichotomously appeared relatively stable; however, age appeared to moderate dichotomous thinking’s effects.

AB - Binary or dichotomous thinking may lead to aggression throughout people’s lifespan; additionally, relationships are likely to be affected by types of aggression (i.e. physical aggression, verbal aggression, anger, and hostility) as well as gender and age. Using large-scale data (N = 2,315), the current study tested if age or gender moderated dichotomous thinking’s correlation with four different types of aggression. Participants (Mage = 36.1, SD = 16.2, range = 18–69) completed the Dichotomous Thinking Inventory and the Buss-Perry Aggression Questionnaire. Dichotomous thinking differentially affected aggression depending on participants’ age: dichotomous thinking and aggression were more strongly correlated in younger participants. Individuals’ tendency to think dichotomously appeared relatively stable; however, age appeared to moderate dichotomous thinking’s effects.

KW - age differences

KW - aggression

KW - dichotomous thinking

KW - gender differences

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85010932227&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85010932227&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/23311908.2016.1244874

DO - 10.1080/23311908.2016.1244874

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85010932227

VL - 3

JO - Cogent Psychology

JF - Cogent Psychology

SN - 2331-1908

IS - 1

M1 - 1244874

ER -