Activity modification in heat: critical assessment of guidelines across athletic, occupational, and military settings in the USA

Yuri Hosokawa, Douglas J. Casa, Juli M. Trtanj, Luke N. Belval, Patricia A. Deuster, Sarah M. Giltz, Andrew J. Grundstein, Michelle D. Hawkins, Robert A. Huggins, Brenda Jacklitsch, John F. Jardine, Hunter Jones, Josh B. Kazman, Mark E. Reynolds, Rebecca L. Stearns, Jennifer K. Vanos, Alan L. Williams, W. Jon Williams

研究成果: Review article

1 引用 (Scopus)

抄録

Exertional heat illness (EHI) risk is a serious concern among athletes, laborers, and warfighters. US Governing organizations have established various activity modification guidelines (AMGs) and other risk mitigation plans to help ensure the health and safety of their workers. The extent of metabolic heat production and heat gain that ensue from their work are the core reasons for EHI in the aforementioned population. Therefore, the major focus of AMGs in all settings is to modulate the work intensity and duration with additional modification in adjustable extrinsic risk factors (e.g., clothing, equipment) and intrinsic risk factors (e.g., heat acclimatization, fitness, hydration status). Future studies should continue to integrate more physiological (e.g., valid body fluid balance, internal body temperature) and biometeorological factors (e.g., cumulative heat stress) to the existing heat risk assessment models to reduce the assumptions and limitations in them. Future interagency collaboration to advance heat mitigation plans among physically active population is desired to maximize the existing resources and data to facilitate advancement in AMGs for environmental heat.

元の言語English
ページ(範囲)405-427
ページ数23
ジャーナルInternational Journal of Biometeorology
63
発行部数3
DOI
出版物ステータスPublished - 2019 3 15
外部発表Yes

Fingerprint

Sports
Hot Temperature
Guidelines
risk factor
mitigation
body fluid
heat production
body temperature
health and safety
hydration
acclimation
risk assessment
fitness
resource
Intrinsic Factor
Clothing
Water-Electrolyte Balance
Thermogenesis
Acclimatization
Body Fluids

Keywords

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Ecology
    • Atmospheric Science
    • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

    これを引用

    Activity modification in heat : critical assessment of guidelines across athletic, occupational, and military settings in the USA. / Hosokawa, Yuri; Casa, Douglas J.; Trtanj, Juli M.; Belval, Luke N.; Deuster, Patricia A.; Giltz, Sarah M.; Grundstein, Andrew J.; Hawkins, Michelle D.; Huggins, Robert A.; Jacklitsch, Brenda; Jardine, John F.; Jones, Hunter; Kazman, Josh B.; Reynolds, Mark E.; Stearns, Rebecca L.; Vanos, Jennifer K.; Williams, Alan L.; Williams, W. Jon.

    :: International Journal of Biometeorology, 巻 63, 番号 3, 15.03.2019, p. 405-427.

    研究成果: Review article

    Hosokawa, Y, Casa, DJ, Trtanj, JM, Belval, LN, Deuster, PA, Giltz, SM, Grundstein, AJ, Hawkins, MD, Huggins, RA, Jacklitsch, B, Jardine, JF, Jones, H, Kazman, JB, Reynolds, ME, Stearns, RL, Vanos, JK, Williams, AL & Williams, WJ 2019, 'Activity modification in heat: critical assessment of guidelines across athletic, occupational, and military settings in the USA' International Journal of Biometeorology, 巻. 63, 番号 3, pp. 405-427. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00484-019-01673-6
    Hosokawa, Yuri ; Casa, Douglas J. ; Trtanj, Juli M. ; Belval, Luke N. ; Deuster, Patricia A. ; Giltz, Sarah M. ; Grundstein, Andrew J. ; Hawkins, Michelle D. ; Huggins, Robert A. ; Jacklitsch, Brenda ; Jardine, John F. ; Jones, Hunter ; Kazman, Josh B. ; Reynolds, Mark E. ; Stearns, Rebecca L. ; Vanos, Jennifer K. ; Williams, Alan L. ; Williams, W. Jon. / Activity modification in heat : critical assessment of guidelines across athletic, occupational, and military settings in the USA. :: International Journal of Biometeorology. 2019 ; 巻 63, 番号 3. pp. 405-427.
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    abstract = "Exertional heat illness (EHI) risk is a serious concern among athletes, laborers, and warfighters. US Governing organizations have established various activity modification guidelines (AMGs) and other risk mitigation plans to help ensure the health and safety of their workers. The extent of metabolic heat production and heat gain that ensue from their work are the core reasons for EHI in the aforementioned population. Therefore, the major focus of AMGs in all settings is to modulate the work intensity and duration with additional modification in adjustable extrinsic risk factors (e.g., clothing, equipment) and intrinsic risk factors (e.g., heat acclimatization, fitness, hydration status). Future studies should continue to integrate more physiological (e.g., valid body fluid balance, internal body temperature) and biometeorological factors (e.g., cumulative heat stress) to the existing heat risk assessment models to reduce the assumptions and limitations in them. Future interagency collaboration to advance heat mitigation plans among physically active population is desired to maximize the existing resources and data to facilitate advancement in AMGs for environmental heat.",
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