Acute cortisol response to a psychosocial stressor is associated with heartbeat perception

Shunta Maeda, Hiroyoshi Ogishima, Hironori Shimada

研究成果: Article

抄録

The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of an acute increase in cortisol in response to a psychosocial stressor on heartbeat perception, in a laboratory environment. Thirty-six participants (20 women, 16 men, mean age = 21.7 years, standard deviation = 1.7 years) completed a heartbeat counting task (Schandry paradigm) before and after exposure to an acute psychosocial stressor (Trier Social Stress Test; TSST). Heartbeat counting performance was compared between participants who exhibited strong cortisol responses (>15.5% increase in cortisol from baseline; responders) and those who did not (non-responders). Responders showed increased heartbeat counting accuracy following the TSST, which was not observed in non-responders. The two groups did not differ in their responsivity to subjective anxiety ratings or heart rate. These results indicated that acutely elevated cortisol in response to a psychosocial stressor is associated with increased interoceptive accuracy. The results provide a possible explanation for inconsistent findings on the effect of stress exposure on interoception.

元の言語English
ページ(範囲)132-138
ページ数7
ジャーナルPhysiology and Behavior
207
DOI
出版物ステータスPublished - 2019 8 1

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Hydrocortisone
Exercise Test
Anxiety
Heart Rate

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

これを引用

Acute cortisol response to a psychosocial stressor is associated with heartbeat perception. / Maeda, Shunta; Ogishima, Hiroyoshi; Shimada, Hironori.

:: Physiology and Behavior, 巻 207, 01.08.2019, p. 132-138.

研究成果: Article

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