An fMRI pilot study evaluating brain activation during different finger training exercises

    研究成果: Conference contribution

    1 引用 (Scopus)

    抄録

    The recovery of motor function after stroke is widely considered to result from brain plasticity. However, what kind of training exercise can better provoke brain plastic processes is still unclear. Studying regional brain activation during a specific training exercise may provide value information that can help design more effective therapeutic approaches. In this paper, we monitored brain activation when subjects performed four different finger training exercises: left middle finger passive movement (LMFP), left middle finger active movement (LMFA), middle finger self-motion control movement (MF), and both middle fingers active movement (BMFA). Eight healthy volunteers were involved in this study. The results indicated that the LFMA results in stronger brain activation than the LMFP in the left insular, left inferior frontal cortex, right middle cingulate cortex, left S1, bilateral cerebellum, SMA, and right inferior frontal areas. However, we did not find a significant difference when comparing the the MF and the BMFA conditions.

    元の言語English
    ホスト出版物のタイトルIEEE International Conference on Rehabilitation Robotics
    出版者IEEE Computer Society
    ページ967-972
    ページ数6
    2015-September
    ISBN(印刷物)9781479918072
    DOI
    出版物ステータスPublished - 2015 9 28
    イベント14th IEEE/RAS-EMBS International Conference on Rehabilitation Robotics, ICORR 2015 - Singapore, Singapore
    継続期間: 2015 8 112015 8 14

    Other

    Other14th IEEE/RAS-EMBS International Conference on Rehabilitation Robotics, ICORR 2015
    Singapore
    Singapore
    期間15/8/1115/8/14

    Fingerprint

    Fingers
    Brain
    Chemical activation
    Magnetic Resonance Imaging
    Exercise
    Motion control
    Plasticity
    Gyrus Cinguli
    Recovery of Function
    Frontal Lobe
    Cerebellum
    Recovery
    Healthy Volunteers
    Stroke

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Control and Systems Engineering
    • Electrical and Electronic Engineering
    • Rehabilitation

    これを引用

    Tang, Z., Iwata, H., & Sugano, S. (2015). An fMRI pilot study evaluating brain activation during different finger training exercises. : IEEE International Conference on Rehabilitation Robotics (巻 2015-September, pp. 967-972). [7281329] IEEE Computer Society. https://doi.org/10.1109/ICORR.2015.7281329

    An fMRI pilot study evaluating brain activation during different finger training exercises. / Tang, Zhenjin; Iwata, Hiroyasu; Sugano, Shigeki.

    IEEE International Conference on Rehabilitation Robotics. 巻 2015-September IEEE Computer Society, 2015. p. 967-972 7281329.

    研究成果: Conference contribution

    Tang, Z, Iwata, H & Sugano, S 2015, An fMRI pilot study evaluating brain activation during different finger training exercises. : IEEE International Conference on Rehabilitation Robotics. 巻. 2015-September, 7281329, IEEE Computer Society, pp. 967-972, 14th IEEE/RAS-EMBS International Conference on Rehabilitation Robotics, ICORR 2015, Singapore, Singapore, 15/8/11. https://doi.org/10.1109/ICORR.2015.7281329
    Tang Z, Iwata H, Sugano S. An fMRI pilot study evaluating brain activation during different finger training exercises. : IEEE International Conference on Rehabilitation Robotics. 巻 2015-September. IEEE Computer Society. 2015. p. 967-972. 7281329 https://doi.org/10.1109/ICORR.2015.7281329
    Tang, Zhenjin ; Iwata, Hiroyasu ; Sugano, Shigeki. / An fMRI pilot study evaluating brain activation during different finger training exercises. IEEE International Conference on Rehabilitation Robotics. 巻 2015-September IEEE Computer Society, 2015. pp. 967-972
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