Changes in depression and anxiety through mindfulness group therapy in Japan

The role of mindfulness and self-compassion as possible mediators

Toru Takahashi, Fukiko Sugiyama, Tomoki Kikai, Issaku Kawashima, Siqing Guan, Mana Oguchi, Taro Uchida, Hiroaki Kumano

研究成果: Article

抄録

Background: Mindfulness-based interventions are increasingly being implemented worldwide for problems with depression and anxiety, and they have shown evidence of efficacy. However, few studies have examined the effects of a mindfulness-based group therapy based on standard programs for depression and anxiety until follow-up in Japan. This study addresses that gap. Furthermore, this study explored the mechanisms of action, focusing on mindfulness, mind wandering, self-compassion, and the behavioral inhibition and behavioral activation systems (BIS/BAS) as possible mediators. Methods: We examined 16 people who suffered from depression and/or anxiety in an 8-week mindfulness group therapy. Measurements were conducted using questionnaires on depression and trait-anxiety (outcome variables), mindfulness, mind wandering, self-compassion, and the BIS/BAS (process variables) at pre- and post-intervention and 2-month follow-up. Changes in the outcome and process variables were tested, and the correlations among the changes in those variables were explored. Results: Depression and anxiety decreased significantly, with moderate to large effect sizes, from pre- to post-intervention and follow-up. In process variables, the observing and nonreactivity facets of mindfulness significantly increased from pre- to post-intervention and follow-up. The nonjudging facet of mindfulness and self-compassion significantly increased from pre-intervention to follow-up. Other facets of mindfulness, mind wandering, and the BIS/BAS did not significantly change. Improvements in some facets of mindfulness and self-compassion and reductions in BIS were significantly correlated with decreases in depression and anxiety. Conclusions: An 8-week mindfulness group therapy program may be effective for people suffering from depression and anxiety in Japan. Mindfulness and self-compassion may be important mediators of the effects of the mindfulness group therapy. Future studies should confirm these findings by using a control group. Trial registration: University Hospital Medical Information Network (UMIN CTR) UMIN000022966. Registered July 1, 2016, https://upload.umin.ac.jp/cgi-open-bin/ctr/ctr-view.cgi?recptno=R000026425

元の言語English
記事番号4
ジャーナルBioPsychoSocial Medicine
13
発行部数1
DOI
出版物ステータスPublished - 2019 2 18

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Mindfulness
Group Psychotherapy
Japan
Anxiety
Depression
Information Services

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Psychology(all)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Biological Psychiatry

これを引用

Changes in depression and anxiety through mindfulness group therapy in Japan : The role of mindfulness and self-compassion as possible mediators. / Takahashi, Toru; Sugiyama, Fukiko; Kikai, Tomoki; Kawashima, Issaku; Guan, Siqing; Oguchi, Mana; Uchida, Taro; Kumano, Hiroaki.

:: BioPsychoSocial Medicine, 巻 13, 番号 1, 4, 18.02.2019.

研究成果: Article

Takahashi, Toru ; Sugiyama, Fukiko ; Kikai, Tomoki ; Kawashima, Issaku ; Guan, Siqing ; Oguchi, Mana ; Uchida, Taro ; Kumano, Hiroaki. / Changes in depression and anxiety through mindfulness group therapy in Japan : The role of mindfulness and self-compassion as possible mediators. :: BioPsychoSocial Medicine. 2019 ; 巻 13, 番号 1.
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AU - Kawashima, Issaku

AU - Guan, Siqing

AU - Oguchi, Mana

AU - Uchida, Taro

AU - Kumano, Hiroaki

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