Characteristics of trace metal concentration and stable isotopic composition of hydrogen and oxygen in “urban-induced heavy rainfall” in downtown Tokyo, Japan; The implication of mineral/dust particles on the formation of summer heavy rainfall

Ryunosuke Uchiyama, Hiroshi Okochi, Hiroko Ogata, Naoya Katsumi, Takanori Nakano

    研究成果: Article

    抄録

    To investigate the impact of mineral/road dust particles on the formation of sudden and locally distributed heavy rain in urban areas (hereafter, urban-induced heavy rain: UHR), we analyzed the trace metal elements and the stable isotope composition of hydrogen and oxygen in rainwater. Rainwater samples, which were collected in Shinjuku (Japan) from April 2014 to December 2015, were analyzed for 12 trace metal elements (Al, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd, Pb, Se, and As) in three fractions: coarse suspended particles (>1.2 μm, CSP), acid-insoluble fine suspended particles (0.45–1.2 μm), and a dissolved/acid-soluble fine suspended fraction. Concentrations and wet deposition fluxes of trace metal elements in CSP were markedly higher in UHR than other types of rainfall, i.e., normal rain, typhoon heavy rain, and frontal heavy rain. There were strong positive correlations between δ18O and the total concentration of trace metal elements in UHR (r = 0.902) and specifically for Fe, Mn, Al, V, and Pb in CSP (r = 0.919, 0.883, 0.823, 0.843, and 0.820, respectively). These findings indicate that mineral/road dust particles were removed by in-cloud scavenging process under the meteorological conditions causing UHR. There is one possibility that they could play important roles as giant cloud condensation nuclei and/or effective ice nuclei for the formation of UHR.

    元の言語English
    ページ(範囲)73-80
    ページ数8
    ジャーナルAtmospheric Research
    217
    DOI
    出版物ステータスPublished - 2019 3 1

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    trace metal
    isotopic composition
    hydrogen
    dust
    oxygen
    rainfall
    summer
    mineral
    rainwater
    road
    cloud condensation nucleus
    acid
    typhoon
    wet deposition
    stable isotope
    urban area
    particle
    rain
    ice

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Atmospheric Science

    これを引用

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    title = "Characteristics of trace metal concentration and stable isotopic composition of hydrogen and oxygen in “urban-induced heavy rainfall” in downtown Tokyo, Japan; The implication of mineral/dust particles on the formation of summer heavy rainfall",
    abstract = "To investigate the impact of mineral/road dust particles on the formation of sudden and locally distributed heavy rain in urban areas (hereafter, urban-induced heavy rain: UHR), we analyzed the trace metal elements and the stable isotope composition of hydrogen and oxygen in rainwater. Rainwater samples, which were collected in Shinjuku (Japan) from April 2014 to December 2015, were analyzed for 12 trace metal elements (Al, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd, Pb, Se, and As) in three fractions: coarse suspended particles (>1.2 μm, CSP), acid-insoluble fine suspended particles (0.45–1.2 μm), and a dissolved/acid-soluble fine suspended fraction. Concentrations and wet deposition fluxes of trace metal elements in CSP were markedly higher in UHR than other types of rainfall, i.e., normal rain, typhoon heavy rain, and frontal heavy rain. There were strong positive correlations between δ18O and the total concentration of trace metal elements in UHR (r = 0.902) and specifically for Fe, Mn, Al, V, and Pb in CSP (r = 0.919, 0.883, 0.823, 0.843, and 0.820, respectively). These findings indicate that mineral/road dust particles were removed by in-cloud scavenging process under the meteorological conditions causing UHR. There is one possibility that they could play important roles as giant cloud condensation nuclei and/or effective ice nuclei for the formation of UHR.",
    keywords = "Air pollutants, Giant cloud condensation nuclei, Heavy rain, Ice nuclei, Mineral/road dust particle, Urban heat island",
    author = "Ryunosuke Uchiyama and Hiroshi Okochi and Hiroko Ogata and Naoya Katsumi and Takanori Nakano",
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    T1 - Characteristics of trace metal concentration and stable isotopic composition of hydrogen and oxygen in “urban-induced heavy rainfall” in downtown Tokyo, Japan; The implication of mineral/dust particles on the formation of summer heavy rainfall

    AU - Uchiyama, Ryunosuke

    AU - Okochi, Hiroshi

    AU - Ogata, Hiroko

    AU - Katsumi, Naoya

    AU - Nakano, Takanori

    PY - 2019/3/1

    Y1 - 2019/3/1

    N2 - To investigate the impact of mineral/road dust particles on the formation of sudden and locally distributed heavy rain in urban areas (hereafter, urban-induced heavy rain: UHR), we analyzed the trace metal elements and the stable isotope composition of hydrogen and oxygen in rainwater. Rainwater samples, which were collected in Shinjuku (Japan) from April 2014 to December 2015, were analyzed for 12 trace metal elements (Al, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd, Pb, Se, and As) in three fractions: coarse suspended particles (>1.2 μm, CSP), acid-insoluble fine suspended particles (0.45–1.2 μm), and a dissolved/acid-soluble fine suspended fraction. Concentrations and wet deposition fluxes of trace metal elements in CSP were markedly higher in UHR than other types of rainfall, i.e., normal rain, typhoon heavy rain, and frontal heavy rain. There were strong positive correlations between δ18O and the total concentration of trace metal elements in UHR (r = 0.902) and specifically for Fe, Mn, Al, V, and Pb in CSP (r = 0.919, 0.883, 0.823, 0.843, and 0.820, respectively). These findings indicate that mineral/road dust particles were removed by in-cloud scavenging process under the meteorological conditions causing UHR. There is one possibility that they could play important roles as giant cloud condensation nuclei and/or effective ice nuclei for the formation of UHR.

    AB - To investigate the impact of mineral/road dust particles on the formation of sudden and locally distributed heavy rain in urban areas (hereafter, urban-induced heavy rain: UHR), we analyzed the trace metal elements and the stable isotope composition of hydrogen and oxygen in rainwater. Rainwater samples, which were collected in Shinjuku (Japan) from April 2014 to December 2015, were analyzed for 12 trace metal elements (Al, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd, Pb, Se, and As) in three fractions: coarse suspended particles (>1.2 μm, CSP), acid-insoluble fine suspended particles (0.45–1.2 μm), and a dissolved/acid-soluble fine suspended fraction. Concentrations and wet deposition fluxes of trace metal elements in CSP were markedly higher in UHR than other types of rainfall, i.e., normal rain, typhoon heavy rain, and frontal heavy rain. There were strong positive correlations between δ18O and the total concentration of trace metal elements in UHR (r = 0.902) and specifically for Fe, Mn, Al, V, and Pb in CSP (r = 0.919, 0.883, 0.823, 0.843, and 0.820, respectively). These findings indicate that mineral/road dust particles were removed by in-cloud scavenging process under the meteorological conditions causing UHR. There is one possibility that they could play important roles as giant cloud condensation nuclei and/or effective ice nuclei for the formation of UHR.

    KW - Air pollutants

    KW - Giant cloud condensation nuclei

    KW - Heavy rain

    KW - Ice nuclei

    KW - Mineral/road dust particle

    KW - Urban heat island

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    U2 - 10.1016/j.atmosres.2018.10.017

    DO - 10.1016/j.atmosres.2018.10.017

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    SP - 73

    EP - 80

    JO - Atmospheric Research

    JF - Atmospheric Research

    SN - 0169-8095

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