Compliance with the national athletic trainers’ Association inter-association task force preseason heat-acclimatization guidelines in high school football

Zachary Y. Kerr, Johna K. Register-Mihalik, Riana R. Pryor, Yuri Hosokawa, Samantha E. Scarneo-Miller, Douglas J. Casa

研究成果: Article

抄録

Context: In 2009, the National Athletic Trainers’ Association Inter-Association Task Force (NATA-IATF) released preseason heat-acclimatization guidelines for gradually acclimatizing high school (HS) athletes to the environment during the first 2 weeks of the preseason and reducing the risk of exertional heat illness. However, researchers who studied the 2011 preseason found a low level of overall compliance. Objective: To assess compliance with the NATA-IATF guidelines during the 2017 preseason and compare the findings with 2011 preseason data and between states mandating and not mandating the guidelines. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Preseason HS football, 2017. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 1023 athletic trainers working with HS football (14.2% response rate). Main Outcome Measure(s): Using a survey, we acquired information from athletic trainers on their HS football programs, including location and compliance with 17 NATA-IATF guidelines during the 2017 football preseason. The outcome measures were full compliance with all 17 NATA-IATF guidelines and compliance with 10 NATA-IATF guidelines. Prevalence ratios (PRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) compared findings between (1) the 2017 and 2011 preseasons and (2) states whose HS athletic associations imposed a full or partial or no mandate to follow the NATA-IATF guidelines. Results: Overall, 3.9% reported full compliance with NATA-IATF guidelines; 73.9% complied with 10 guidelines. The proportion reporting full compliance was higher in 2017 than in 2011 but not statistically different (3.9% versus 2.5%; PR ¼ 1.54; 95% CI ¼ 0.96, 2.46). However, the proportion reporting compliance with 10 guidelines was higher in 2017 (73.9% versus 57.9%; PR ¼ 1.28; 95% CI ¼ 1.20, 1.36). The proportion of respondents reporting their HSs were fully compliant was highest among the with-mandate group (9.4%), followed by the partial-mandate group (4.6%) and the without-mandate group (0.6%). Group differences retained significance when we examined compliance with 10 guidelines. Conclusions: Although full compliance with NATA-IATF guidelines remained low, many HS football programs complied with 10 guidelines.

元の言語English
ページ(範囲)749-757
ページ数9
ジャーナルJournal of athletic training
54
発行部数7
DOI
出版物ステータスPublished - 2019 1 1

Fingerprint

Football
Acclimatization
Advisory Committees
Sports
Hot Temperature
Guidelines
Confidence Intervals
Compliance
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Athletes
Cross-Sectional Studies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

これを引用

Compliance with the national athletic trainers’ Association inter-association task force preseason heat-acclimatization guidelines in high school football. / Kerr, Zachary Y.; Register-Mihalik, Johna K.; Pryor, Riana R.; Hosokawa, Yuri; Scarneo-Miller, Samantha E.; Casa, Douglas J.

:: Journal of athletic training, 巻 54, 番号 7, 01.01.2019, p. 749-757.

研究成果: Article

Kerr, Zachary Y. ; Register-Mihalik, Johna K. ; Pryor, Riana R. ; Hosokawa, Yuri ; Scarneo-Miller, Samantha E. ; Casa, Douglas J. / Compliance with the national athletic trainers’ Association inter-association task force preseason heat-acclimatization guidelines in high school football. :: Journal of athletic training. 2019 ; 巻 54, 番号 7. pp. 749-757.
@article{a1532853576144c3a49e6c4bc6a1f337,
title = "Compliance with the national athletic trainers’ Association inter-association task force preseason heat-acclimatization guidelines in high school football",
abstract = "Context: In 2009, the National Athletic Trainers’ Association Inter-Association Task Force (NATA-IATF) released preseason heat-acclimatization guidelines for gradually acclimatizing high school (HS) athletes to the environment during the first 2 weeks of the preseason and reducing the risk of exertional heat illness. However, researchers who studied the 2011 preseason found a low level of overall compliance. Objective: To assess compliance with the NATA-IATF guidelines during the 2017 preseason and compare the findings with 2011 preseason data and between states mandating and not mandating the guidelines. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Preseason HS football, 2017. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 1023 athletic trainers working with HS football (14.2{\%} response rate). Main Outcome Measure(s): Using a survey, we acquired information from athletic trainers on their HS football programs, including location and compliance with 17 NATA-IATF guidelines during the 2017 football preseason. The outcome measures were full compliance with all 17 NATA-IATF guidelines and compliance with 10 NATA-IATF guidelines. Prevalence ratios (PRs) with 95{\%} confidence intervals (CIs) compared findings between (1) the 2017 and 2011 preseasons and (2) states whose HS athletic associations imposed a full or partial or no mandate to follow the NATA-IATF guidelines. Results: Overall, 3.9{\%} reported full compliance with NATA-IATF guidelines; 73.9{\%} complied with 10 guidelines. The proportion reporting full compliance was higher in 2017 than in 2011 but not statistically different (3.9{\%} versus 2.5{\%}; PR ¼ 1.54; 95{\%} CI ¼ 0.96, 2.46). However, the proportion reporting compliance with 10 guidelines was higher in 2017 (73.9{\%} versus 57.9{\%}; PR ¼ 1.28; 95{\%} CI ¼ 1.20, 1.36). The proportion of respondents reporting their HSs were fully compliant was highest among the with-mandate group (9.4{\%}), followed by the partial-mandate group (4.6{\%}) and the without-mandate group (0.6{\%}). Group differences retained significance when we examined compliance with 10 guidelines. Conclusions: Although full compliance with NATA-IATF guidelines remained low, many HS football programs complied with 10 guidelines.",
keywords = "Exertional heat illness, Heat stroke, High school athletes, Injury prevention, Policy",
author = "Kerr, {Zachary Y.} and Register-Mihalik, {Johna K.} and Pryor, {Riana R.} and Yuri Hosokawa and Scarneo-Miller, {Samantha E.} and Casa, {Douglas J.}",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.4085/1062-6050-373-18",
language = "English",
volume = "54",
pages = "749--757",
journal = "Journal of Athletic Training",
issn = "1062-6050",
publisher = "National Athletic Trainers' Association Inc.",
number = "7",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Compliance with the national athletic trainers’ Association inter-association task force preseason heat-acclimatization guidelines in high school football

AU - Kerr, Zachary Y.

AU - Register-Mihalik, Johna K.

AU - Pryor, Riana R.

AU - Hosokawa, Yuri

AU - Scarneo-Miller, Samantha E.

AU - Casa, Douglas J.

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - Context: In 2009, the National Athletic Trainers’ Association Inter-Association Task Force (NATA-IATF) released preseason heat-acclimatization guidelines for gradually acclimatizing high school (HS) athletes to the environment during the first 2 weeks of the preseason and reducing the risk of exertional heat illness. However, researchers who studied the 2011 preseason found a low level of overall compliance. Objective: To assess compliance with the NATA-IATF guidelines during the 2017 preseason and compare the findings with 2011 preseason data and between states mandating and not mandating the guidelines. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Preseason HS football, 2017. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 1023 athletic trainers working with HS football (14.2% response rate). Main Outcome Measure(s): Using a survey, we acquired information from athletic trainers on their HS football programs, including location and compliance with 17 NATA-IATF guidelines during the 2017 football preseason. The outcome measures were full compliance with all 17 NATA-IATF guidelines and compliance with 10 NATA-IATF guidelines. Prevalence ratios (PRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) compared findings between (1) the 2017 and 2011 preseasons and (2) states whose HS athletic associations imposed a full or partial or no mandate to follow the NATA-IATF guidelines. Results: Overall, 3.9% reported full compliance with NATA-IATF guidelines; 73.9% complied with 10 guidelines. The proportion reporting full compliance was higher in 2017 than in 2011 but not statistically different (3.9% versus 2.5%; PR ¼ 1.54; 95% CI ¼ 0.96, 2.46). However, the proportion reporting compliance with 10 guidelines was higher in 2017 (73.9% versus 57.9%; PR ¼ 1.28; 95% CI ¼ 1.20, 1.36). The proportion of respondents reporting their HSs were fully compliant was highest among the with-mandate group (9.4%), followed by the partial-mandate group (4.6%) and the without-mandate group (0.6%). Group differences retained significance when we examined compliance with 10 guidelines. Conclusions: Although full compliance with NATA-IATF guidelines remained low, many HS football programs complied with 10 guidelines.

AB - Context: In 2009, the National Athletic Trainers’ Association Inter-Association Task Force (NATA-IATF) released preseason heat-acclimatization guidelines for gradually acclimatizing high school (HS) athletes to the environment during the first 2 weeks of the preseason and reducing the risk of exertional heat illness. However, researchers who studied the 2011 preseason found a low level of overall compliance. Objective: To assess compliance with the NATA-IATF guidelines during the 2017 preseason and compare the findings with 2011 preseason data and between states mandating and not mandating the guidelines. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Preseason HS football, 2017. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 1023 athletic trainers working with HS football (14.2% response rate). Main Outcome Measure(s): Using a survey, we acquired information from athletic trainers on their HS football programs, including location and compliance with 17 NATA-IATF guidelines during the 2017 football preseason. The outcome measures were full compliance with all 17 NATA-IATF guidelines and compliance with 10 NATA-IATF guidelines. Prevalence ratios (PRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) compared findings between (1) the 2017 and 2011 preseasons and (2) states whose HS athletic associations imposed a full or partial or no mandate to follow the NATA-IATF guidelines. Results: Overall, 3.9% reported full compliance with NATA-IATF guidelines; 73.9% complied with 10 guidelines. The proportion reporting full compliance was higher in 2017 than in 2011 but not statistically different (3.9% versus 2.5%; PR ¼ 1.54; 95% CI ¼ 0.96, 2.46). However, the proportion reporting compliance with 10 guidelines was higher in 2017 (73.9% versus 57.9%; PR ¼ 1.28; 95% CI ¼ 1.20, 1.36). The proportion of respondents reporting their HSs were fully compliant was highest among the with-mandate group (9.4%), followed by the partial-mandate group (4.6%) and the without-mandate group (0.6%). Group differences retained significance when we examined compliance with 10 guidelines. Conclusions: Although full compliance with NATA-IATF guidelines remained low, many HS football programs complied with 10 guidelines.

KW - Exertional heat illness

KW - Heat stroke

KW - High school athletes

KW - Injury prevention

KW - Policy

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85071230044&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85071230044&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.4085/1062-6050-373-18

DO - 10.4085/1062-6050-373-18

M3 - Article

C2 - 31343275

AN - SCOPUS:85071230044

VL - 54

SP - 749

EP - 757

JO - Journal of Athletic Training

JF - Journal of Athletic Training

SN - 1062-6050

IS - 7

ER -