Distinct associations of different sedentary behaviors with health-related attributes among older adults

Hiroyuki Kikuchi, Shigeru Inoue, Takemi Sugiyama, Neville Owen, Koichiro Oka, Tomoki Nakaya, Teruichi Shimomitsu

研究成果: Article

31 引用 (Scopus)

抄録

Objective Leisure-time sedentary behaviors (LTSBs) have been associated adversely with health outcomes. However, limited research has focused on different categories of LTSB. We aimed at identifying categories of LTSBs and examining their separate associations with indices of health among Japanese older adults. Methods A postal survey collected data on self-reported health, psychological distress, body mass index, moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA), LTSBs (five behaviors) and socio-demographic characteristics from 1,580 Japanese older adults (67% response rate; 65–74 years) in 2010. Exploratory factor analysis was used to classify LTSBs. Odds ratios (ORs) were calculated for associations of LTSB categories with self-reported health, psychological distress, overweight, and lower MVPA. Data were analyzed in 2013. Results Two categories of LTSB: passive sedentary time (consisting of TV time, listening or talking while sitting, and sitting around) and mentally-active sedentary time (consisting of computer-use and reading books or newspapers) were identified. Higher passive sedentary time was associated with a higher odds of being overweight (OR: 1.39, [95% CI: 1.08–1.80]), and lower MVPA (1.26, [1.02–1.54]). Higher mentally-active sedentary time was associated with lower odds of lower MVPA (0.70, [0.57–0.86]). Conclusions Two types of sedentary time—passive and mentally-active—may play different roles in older adults’ well-being.

元の言語English
ページ(範囲)335-339
ページ数5
ジャーナルPreventive Medicine
67
DOI
出版物ステータスPublished - 1970 1 1

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Leisure Activities
Health
Odds Ratio
Psychology
Newspapers
Statistical Factor Analysis
Reading
Body Mass Index
Demography
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

これを引用

Distinct associations of different sedentary behaviors with health-related attributes among older adults. / Kikuchi, Hiroyuki; Inoue, Shigeru; Sugiyama, Takemi; Owen, Neville; Oka, Koichiro; Nakaya, Tomoki; Shimomitsu, Teruichi.

:: Preventive Medicine, 巻 67, 01.01.1970, p. 335-339.

研究成果: Article

Kikuchi, Hiroyuki ; Inoue, Shigeru ; Sugiyama, Takemi ; Owen, Neville ; Oka, Koichiro ; Nakaya, Tomoki ; Shimomitsu, Teruichi. / Distinct associations of different sedentary behaviors with health-related attributes among older adults. :: Preventive Medicine. 1970 ; 巻 67. pp. 335-339.
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abstract = "Objective Leisure-time sedentary behaviors (LTSBs) have been associated adversely with health outcomes. However, limited research has focused on different categories of LTSB. We aimed at identifying categories of LTSBs and examining their separate associations with indices of health among Japanese older adults. Methods A postal survey collected data on self-reported health, psychological distress, body mass index, moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA), LTSBs (five behaviors) and socio-demographic characteristics from 1,580 Japanese older adults (67{\%} response rate; 65–74 years) in 2010. Exploratory factor analysis was used to classify LTSBs. Odds ratios (ORs) were calculated for associations of LTSB categories with self-reported health, psychological distress, overweight, and lower MVPA. Data were analyzed in 2013. Results Two categories of LTSB: passive sedentary time (consisting of TV time, listening or talking while sitting, and sitting around) and mentally-active sedentary time (consisting of computer-use and reading books or newspapers) were identified. Higher passive sedentary time was associated with a higher odds of being overweight (OR: 1.39, [95{\%} CI: 1.08–1.80]), and lower MVPA (1.26, [1.02–1.54]). Higher mentally-active sedentary time was associated with lower odds of lower MVPA (0.70, [0.57–0.86]). Conclusions Two types of sedentary time—passive and mentally-active—may play different roles in older adults’ well-being.",
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AU - Oka, Koichiro

AU - Nakaya, Tomoki

AU - Shimomitsu, Teruichi

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N2 - Objective Leisure-time sedentary behaviors (LTSBs) have been associated adversely with health outcomes. However, limited research has focused on different categories of LTSB. We aimed at identifying categories of LTSBs and examining their separate associations with indices of health among Japanese older adults. Methods A postal survey collected data on self-reported health, psychological distress, body mass index, moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA), LTSBs (five behaviors) and socio-demographic characteristics from 1,580 Japanese older adults (67% response rate; 65–74 years) in 2010. Exploratory factor analysis was used to classify LTSBs. Odds ratios (ORs) were calculated for associations of LTSB categories with self-reported health, psychological distress, overweight, and lower MVPA. Data were analyzed in 2013. Results Two categories of LTSB: passive sedentary time (consisting of TV time, listening or talking while sitting, and sitting around) and mentally-active sedentary time (consisting of computer-use and reading books or newspapers) were identified. Higher passive sedentary time was associated with a higher odds of being overweight (OR: 1.39, [95% CI: 1.08–1.80]), and lower MVPA (1.26, [1.02–1.54]). Higher mentally-active sedentary time was associated with lower odds of lower MVPA (0.70, [0.57–0.86]). Conclusions Two types of sedentary time—passive and mentally-active—may play different roles in older adults’ well-being.

AB - Objective Leisure-time sedentary behaviors (LTSBs) have been associated adversely with health outcomes. However, limited research has focused on different categories of LTSB. We aimed at identifying categories of LTSBs and examining their separate associations with indices of health among Japanese older adults. Methods A postal survey collected data on self-reported health, psychological distress, body mass index, moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA), LTSBs (five behaviors) and socio-demographic characteristics from 1,580 Japanese older adults (67% response rate; 65–74 years) in 2010. Exploratory factor analysis was used to classify LTSBs. Odds ratios (ORs) were calculated for associations of LTSB categories with self-reported health, psychological distress, overweight, and lower MVPA. Data were analyzed in 2013. Results Two categories of LTSB: passive sedentary time (consisting of TV time, listening or talking while sitting, and sitting around) and mentally-active sedentary time (consisting of computer-use and reading books or newspapers) were identified. Higher passive sedentary time was associated with a higher odds of being overweight (OR: 1.39, [95% CI: 1.08–1.80]), and lower MVPA (1.26, [1.02–1.54]). Higher mentally-active sedentary time was associated with lower odds of lower MVPA (0.70, [0.57–0.86]). Conclusions Two types of sedentary time—passive and mentally-active—may play different roles in older adults’ well-being.

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