Effect of weight loss on maximal fat oxidation rate in obese men

Takehiko Tsujimoto, Hiroyuki Sasai, Masashi Miyashita, Miki Eto, Rina So, Hiroyuki Ohkubo, Kiyoji Tanaka

研究成果: Article

4 引用 (Scopus)

抄録

Introduction: The hallmark features of obesity include insulin resistance and an impaired ability to oxidize lipids. As compared to exercise training, it remains relatively unclear if diet-induced weight loss can also induce fat metabolism. This study was undertaken to examine the effects of diet-induced weight loss on fat metabolism during a single session of exercise in middle-aged obese men. Methods: Fifteen obese men who were otherwise healthy (average age of 53.5 ± 6.9 yr and average body mass index of 27.8 ± 1.6 kg/m 2) participated in a 12-wk weight loss program primarily consisting of dietary modification. Maximal fat oxidation (MFO) rates, MFO per lean body mass (MFO LBM) and insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) were measured before and after the program. Participants performed a 24-min graded exercise test on a cycle ergometer, with 15-W increments every 4 min. Expired gas analysis was performed by indirect calorimetry, and nonprotein respiratory quotient equations were used to calculate fat oxidation rates. Results: The weight (-8.3 ± 3.8 kg), fat mass (-4.5 ± 1.9 kg), and lean body mass (-3.8 ± 2.4 kg) (P <0.001 for all measurements) of the participants were decreased at the end of the 12-wk program. The MFO tended to increase by 19% (P = 0.08) and MFO LBM significantly increased by 28.8% (P = 0.02). Although insulin resistance also significantly decreased by 49% (P <0.001), changes in fat oxidation variables did not correlate with changes in insulin resistance. Conclusion: Diet-induced weight loss improves fat metabolism with the improvement in insulin resistance.

元の言語English
ジャーナルObesity Research and Clinical Practice
6
発行部数2
DOI
出版物ステータスPublished - 2012 4

Fingerprint

Weight Loss
Fats
Insulin Resistance
Reducing Diet
Exercise
Weight Reduction Programs
Diet Therapy
Indirect Calorimetry
Exercise Test
Body Mass Index
Obesity
Gases
Lipids
Weights and Measures

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

これを引用

Effect of weight loss on maximal fat oxidation rate in obese men. / Tsujimoto, Takehiko; Sasai, Hiroyuki; Miyashita, Masashi; Eto, Miki; So, Rina; Ohkubo, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Kiyoji.

:: Obesity Research and Clinical Practice, 巻 6, 番号 2, 04.2012.

研究成果: Article

Tsujimoto, Takehiko ; Sasai, Hiroyuki ; Miyashita, Masashi ; Eto, Miki ; So, Rina ; Ohkubo, Hiroyuki ; Tanaka, Kiyoji. / Effect of weight loss on maximal fat oxidation rate in obese men. :: Obesity Research and Clinical Practice. 2012 ; 巻 6, 番号 2.
@article{6e1458a90d614b13a6dd329da637a234,
title = "Effect of weight loss on maximal fat oxidation rate in obese men",
abstract = "Introduction: The hallmark features of obesity include insulin resistance and an impaired ability to oxidize lipids. As compared to exercise training, it remains relatively unclear if diet-induced weight loss can also induce fat metabolism. This study was undertaken to examine the effects of diet-induced weight loss on fat metabolism during a single session of exercise in middle-aged obese men. Methods: Fifteen obese men who were otherwise healthy (average age of 53.5 ± 6.9 yr and average body mass index of 27.8 ± 1.6 kg/m 2) participated in a 12-wk weight loss program primarily consisting of dietary modification. Maximal fat oxidation (MFO) rates, MFO per lean body mass (MFO LBM) and insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) were measured before and after the program. Participants performed a 24-min graded exercise test on a cycle ergometer, with 15-W increments every 4 min. Expired gas analysis was performed by indirect calorimetry, and nonprotein respiratory quotient equations were used to calculate fat oxidation rates. Results: The weight (-8.3 ± 3.8 kg), fat mass (-4.5 ± 1.9 kg), and lean body mass (-3.8 ± 2.4 kg) (P <0.001 for all measurements) of the participants were decreased at the end of the 12-wk program. The MFO tended to increase by 19{\%} (P = 0.08) and MFO LBM significantly increased by 28.8{\%} (P = 0.02). Although insulin resistance also significantly decreased by 49{\%} (P <0.001), changes in fat oxidation variables did not correlate with changes in insulin resistance. Conclusion: Diet-induced weight loss improves fat metabolism with the improvement in insulin resistance.",
keywords = "Maximal fat oxidation rate, Obesity, Weight loss",
author = "Takehiko Tsujimoto and Hiroyuki Sasai and Masashi Miyashita and Miki Eto and Rina So and Hiroyuki Ohkubo and Kiyoji Tanaka",
year = "2012",
month = "4",
doi = "10.1016/j.orcp.2011.06.003",
language = "English",
volume = "6",
journal = "Obesity Research and Clinical Practice",
issn = "1871-403X",
publisher = "Elsevier BV",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effect of weight loss on maximal fat oxidation rate in obese men

AU - Tsujimoto, Takehiko

AU - Sasai, Hiroyuki

AU - Miyashita, Masashi

AU - Eto, Miki

AU - So, Rina

AU - Ohkubo, Hiroyuki

AU - Tanaka, Kiyoji

PY - 2012/4

Y1 - 2012/4

N2 - Introduction: The hallmark features of obesity include insulin resistance and an impaired ability to oxidize lipids. As compared to exercise training, it remains relatively unclear if diet-induced weight loss can also induce fat metabolism. This study was undertaken to examine the effects of diet-induced weight loss on fat metabolism during a single session of exercise in middle-aged obese men. Methods: Fifteen obese men who were otherwise healthy (average age of 53.5 ± 6.9 yr and average body mass index of 27.8 ± 1.6 kg/m 2) participated in a 12-wk weight loss program primarily consisting of dietary modification. Maximal fat oxidation (MFO) rates, MFO per lean body mass (MFO LBM) and insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) were measured before and after the program. Participants performed a 24-min graded exercise test on a cycle ergometer, with 15-W increments every 4 min. Expired gas analysis was performed by indirect calorimetry, and nonprotein respiratory quotient equations were used to calculate fat oxidation rates. Results: The weight (-8.3 ± 3.8 kg), fat mass (-4.5 ± 1.9 kg), and lean body mass (-3.8 ± 2.4 kg) (P <0.001 for all measurements) of the participants were decreased at the end of the 12-wk program. The MFO tended to increase by 19% (P = 0.08) and MFO LBM significantly increased by 28.8% (P = 0.02). Although insulin resistance also significantly decreased by 49% (P <0.001), changes in fat oxidation variables did not correlate with changes in insulin resistance. Conclusion: Diet-induced weight loss improves fat metabolism with the improvement in insulin resistance.

AB - Introduction: The hallmark features of obesity include insulin resistance and an impaired ability to oxidize lipids. As compared to exercise training, it remains relatively unclear if diet-induced weight loss can also induce fat metabolism. This study was undertaken to examine the effects of diet-induced weight loss on fat metabolism during a single session of exercise in middle-aged obese men. Methods: Fifteen obese men who were otherwise healthy (average age of 53.5 ± 6.9 yr and average body mass index of 27.8 ± 1.6 kg/m 2) participated in a 12-wk weight loss program primarily consisting of dietary modification. Maximal fat oxidation (MFO) rates, MFO per lean body mass (MFO LBM) and insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) were measured before and after the program. Participants performed a 24-min graded exercise test on a cycle ergometer, with 15-W increments every 4 min. Expired gas analysis was performed by indirect calorimetry, and nonprotein respiratory quotient equations were used to calculate fat oxidation rates. Results: The weight (-8.3 ± 3.8 kg), fat mass (-4.5 ± 1.9 kg), and lean body mass (-3.8 ± 2.4 kg) (P <0.001 for all measurements) of the participants were decreased at the end of the 12-wk program. The MFO tended to increase by 19% (P = 0.08) and MFO LBM significantly increased by 28.8% (P = 0.02). Although insulin resistance also significantly decreased by 49% (P <0.001), changes in fat oxidation variables did not correlate with changes in insulin resistance. Conclusion: Diet-induced weight loss improves fat metabolism with the improvement in insulin resistance.

KW - Maximal fat oxidation rate

KW - Obesity

KW - Weight loss

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84859421774&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84859421774&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.orcp.2011.06.003

DO - 10.1016/j.orcp.2011.06.003

M3 - Article

VL - 6

JO - Obesity Research and Clinical Practice

JF - Obesity Research and Clinical Practice

SN - 1871-403X

IS - 2

ER -