Modes of action of local hypothalamic and skin thermal stimulation on salivary secretion in rats

Kazuyuki Kanosue, T. Nakayama, H. Tanaka, M. Yanase, H. Yasuda

研究成果: Article

42 引用 (Scopus)

抄録

In urethane or ketamine-anaesthetized rats, salivary secretion was observed when local brain sites or trunk skin were stimulated thermally or electrically. Salivary secretion was facilitated by bilateral local brain warming. Sensitive sites were restricted to the preoptic area and anterior hypothalamus, but in a region distinct from a previously reported sensitive for producing saliva-spreading behaviour. Unilateral warming of the preoptic area produced greater salivary secretion from the ipsilateral submandibular/sublingual salivary glands than from the contra-lateral glands. Electrical stimulation of the same sites elicited salivation only from the ipsilateral glands. Trunk skin, not including the scrotum, was unilaterally cooled when spontaneous salivary secretion was observed in a hot environment. Salivary secretion from both sides was equally suppressed in response to the unilateral skin cooling. We conclude that efferent signals from the anterior part of the hypothalamus project dominantly to the ipsilateral salivary gland for thermally induced salivary secretion. Thermal signals from the skin of either side of the trunk, on the other hand, appear to be integrated and to affect salivary secretion bilaterally.

元の言語English
ページ(範囲)459-471
ページ数13
ジャーナルJournal of Physiology
424
出版物ステータスPublished - 1990
外部発表Yes

Fingerprint

Hot Temperature
Anterior Hypothalamus
Skin
Preoptic Area
Salivary Glands
Sublingual Gland
Salivation
Scrotum
Urethane
Brain
Ketamine
Saliva
Electric Stimulation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology

これを引用

Modes of action of local hypothalamic and skin thermal stimulation on salivary secretion in rats. / Kanosue, Kazuyuki; Nakayama, T.; Tanaka, H.; Yanase, M.; Yasuda, H.

:: Journal of Physiology, 巻 424, 1990, p. 459-471.

研究成果: Article

Kanosue, Kazuyuki ; Nakayama, T. ; Tanaka, H. ; Yanase, M. ; Yasuda, H. / Modes of action of local hypothalamic and skin thermal stimulation on salivary secretion in rats. :: Journal of Physiology. 1990 ; 巻 424. pp. 459-471.
@article{0ca88d7198ea44abae70f345a50b0c73,
title = "Modes of action of local hypothalamic and skin thermal stimulation on salivary secretion in rats",
abstract = "In urethane or ketamine-anaesthetized rats, salivary secretion was observed when local brain sites or trunk skin were stimulated thermally or electrically. Salivary secretion was facilitated by bilateral local brain warming. Sensitive sites were restricted to the preoptic area and anterior hypothalamus, but in a region distinct from a previously reported sensitive for producing saliva-spreading behaviour. Unilateral warming of the preoptic area produced greater salivary secretion from the ipsilateral submandibular/sublingual salivary glands than from the contra-lateral glands. Electrical stimulation of the same sites elicited salivation only from the ipsilateral glands. Trunk skin, not including the scrotum, was unilaterally cooled when spontaneous salivary secretion was observed in a hot environment. Salivary secretion from both sides was equally suppressed in response to the unilateral skin cooling. We conclude that efferent signals from the anterior part of the hypothalamus project dominantly to the ipsilateral salivary gland for thermally induced salivary secretion. Thermal signals from the skin of either side of the trunk, on the other hand, appear to be integrated and to affect salivary secretion bilaterally.",
author = "Kazuyuki Kanosue and T. Nakayama and H. Tanaka and M. Yanase and H. Yasuda",
year = "1990",
language = "English",
volume = "424",
pages = "459--471",
journal = "Journal of Physiology",
issn = "0022-3751",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Modes of action of local hypothalamic and skin thermal stimulation on salivary secretion in rats

AU - Kanosue, Kazuyuki

AU - Nakayama, T.

AU - Tanaka, H.

AU - Yanase, M.

AU - Yasuda, H.

PY - 1990

Y1 - 1990

N2 - In urethane or ketamine-anaesthetized rats, salivary secretion was observed when local brain sites or trunk skin were stimulated thermally or electrically. Salivary secretion was facilitated by bilateral local brain warming. Sensitive sites were restricted to the preoptic area and anterior hypothalamus, but in a region distinct from a previously reported sensitive for producing saliva-spreading behaviour. Unilateral warming of the preoptic area produced greater salivary secretion from the ipsilateral submandibular/sublingual salivary glands than from the contra-lateral glands. Electrical stimulation of the same sites elicited salivation only from the ipsilateral glands. Trunk skin, not including the scrotum, was unilaterally cooled when spontaneous salivary secretion was observed in a hot environment. Salivary secretion from both sides was equally suppressed in response to the unilateral skin cooling. We conclude that efferent signals from the anterior part of the hypothalamus project dominantly to the ipsilateral salivary gland for thermally induced salivary secretion. Thermal signals from the skin of either side of the trunk, on the other hand, appear to be integrated and to affect salivary secretion bilaterally.

AB - In urethane or ketamine-anaesthetized rats, salivary secretion was observed when local brain sites or trunk skin were stimulated thermally or electrically. Salivary secretion was facilitated by bilateral local brain warming. Sensitive sites were restricted to the preoptic area and anterior hypothalamus, but in a region distinct from a previously reported sensitive for producing saliva-spreading behaviour. Unilateral warming of the preoptic area produced greater salivary secretion from the ipsilateral submandibular/sublingual salivary glands than from the contra-lateral glands. Electrical stimulation of the same sites elicited salivation only from the ipsilateral glands. Trunk skin, not including the scrotum, was unilaterally cooled when spontaneous salivary secretion was observed in a hot environment. Salivary secretion from both sides was equally suppressed in response to the unilateral skin cooling. We conclude that efferent signals from the anterior part of the hypothalamus project dominantly to the ipsilateral salivary gland for thermally induced salivary secretion. Thermal signals from the skin of either side of the trunk, on the other hand, appear to be integrated and to affect salivary secretion bilaterally.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0025360236&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0025360236&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 2391658

AN - SCOPUS:0025360236

VL - 424

SP - 459

EP - 471

JO - Journal of Physiology

JF - Journal of Physiology

SN - 0022-3751

ER -