People living in hilly residential areas in metropolitan Perth have less diabetes: Spurious association or important environmental determinant?

Karen Villanueva*, Matthew Knuiman, Mohammad Javad Koohsari, Sharyn Hickey, Sarah Foster, Hannah Badland, Andrea Nathan, Fiona Bull, Billie Giles-Corti

*この研究の対応する著者

研究成果: Article査読

18 被引用数 (Scopus)

抄録

Background: Variations in 'slope' (how steep or flat the ground is) may be good for health. As walking up hills is a physiologically vigorous physical activity and can contribute to weight control, greater neighbourhood slopes may provide a protective barrier to weight gain, and help prevent Type 2 diabetes onset. We explored whether living in 'hilly' neighbourhoods was associated with diabetes prevalence among the Australian adult population. Methods: Participants (≥25 years; n = 11,406) who completed the Western Australian Health and Wellbeing Surveillance System Survey (2003-2009) were asked whether or not they had medically-diagnosed diabetes. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) software was used to calculate a neighbourhood mean slope score, and other built environment measures at 1600 m around each participant's home. Logistic regression models were used to predict the odds of self-reported diabetes after progressive adjustment for individual measures (i.e., age, sex), socioeconomic status (i.e., education, income), built environment, destinations, nutrition, and amount of walking. Results: After full adjustment, the odds of self-reported diabetes was 0.72 (95% CI 0.55-0.95) and 0.52 (95% CI 0.39-0.69) for adults living in neighbourhoods with moderate and higher levels of slope, respectively, compared with adults living in neighbourhoods with the lowest levels of slope. The odds of having diabetes was 13% lower (odds ratio 0.87; 95% CI 0.80-0.94) for each increase of one percent in mean slope. Conclusions: Living in a hilly neighbourhood may be protective of diabetes onset or this finding is spurious. Nevertheless, the results are promising and have implications for future research and the practice of flattening land in new housing developments.

本文言語English
論文番号59
ジャーナルInternational Journal of Health Geographics
12
1
DOI
出版ステータスPublished - 2013
外部発表はい

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • コンピュータ サイエンス(全般)
  • ビジネス、管理および会計(全般)
  • 公衆衛生学、環境および労働衛生

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