Regulation of chromatin structure by curved DNA: How activator binding sites become accessible

    研究成果: Chapter

    抄録

    A single somatic cell of humans contains DNA fibers of a total length of approximately 2 m, which are compacted, without entanglement, into the nucleus of approximately 1×10-5 m in diameter. To greater or lesser degrees, all organisms compact their DNA. Biologically important DNA regions, such as the origins of DNA replication, regulatory regions of transcription, and recombination loci, must all be compacted. The tightly constrained DNA, however, presents the appropriate environment for replication, transcription, and recombination to take place.

    元の言語English
    ホスト出版物のタイトルNuclear Dynamics: Molecular Biology and Visualization of the Nucleus
    出版者Springer Japan
    ページ227-238
    ページ数12
    ISBN(印刷物)9784431301301, 4431300546, 9784431300540
    DOI
    出版物ステータスPublished - 2007

    Fingerprint

    Chromatin
    Binding Sites
    DNA
    Genetic Recombination
    Transcription
    Replication Origin
    Nucleic Acid Regulatory Sequences
    DNA Replication
    Cells
    Fibers

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

    これを引用

    Ohyama, T. (2007). Regulation of chromatin structure by curved DNA: How activator binding sites become accessible. : Nuclear Dynamics: Molecular Biology and Visualization of the Nucleus (pp. 227-238). Springer Japan. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-4-431-30130-1_10

    Regulation of chromatin structure by curved DNA : How activator binding sites become accessible. / Ohyama, Takashi.

    Nuclear Dynamics: Molecular Biology and Visualization of the Nucleus. Springer Japan, 2007. p. 227-238.

    研究成果: Chapter

    Ohyama, T 2007, Regulation of chromatin structure by curved DNA: How activator binding sites become accessible. : Nuclear Dynamics: Molecular Biology and Visualization of the Nucleus. Springer Japan, pp. 227-238. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-4-431-30130-1_10
    Ohyama T. Regulation of chromatin structure by curved DNA: How activator binding sites become accessible. : Nuclear Dynamics: Molecular Biology and Visualization of the Nucleus. Springer Japan. 2007. p. 227-238 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-4-431-30130-1_10
    Ohyama, Takashi. / Regulation of chromatin structure by curved DNA : How activator binding sites become accessible. Nuclear Dynamics: Molecular Biology and Visualization of the Nucleus. Springer Japan, 2007. pp. 227-238
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