Soil microbial biomass, respiration rate, and temperature dependence on a successional glacier foreland in Ny-Ålesund, Svalbard

Yukiko Sakata Bekku, Takayuki Nakatsubo, Atsushi Kume, Hiroshi Koizumi

研究成果: Article

45 引用 (Scopus)

抄録

We examined soil microbial activities, i.e., biomass, respiration rate, and temperature dependence of the respiration on a glacier foreland in Ny-Ålesund, Svalbard, Norway. We collected soil samples from 4 study sites that were set up along a primary succession (Site 1, the youngest, to Site 4, the oldest). Microbial biomass measured with the SIR method increased with successional age (55 to 724μg Cbiomass g-1 soil d.w. from Site 1 to Site 4). The microbial respiration rate of the soil was measured in a laboratory with an open-flow infrared gas-analyzer system, changing the temperature from 2° to 20°C at 3-4° intervals. The microbial respiration rate increased exponentially with the temperature at all sites. The temperature dependence (Q10) of the microbial respiration rate ranged from 2.2 to 4.1. The microbial respiration rates at a given temperature increased with succession as a step change (0.48, 0.43, 1.26, and 1.29μg C g-1soil h-1 at 8°C from Site 1 to Site 4, respectively). However, the substrate-specific respiration rate (respiration rate per gram soil carbon) decreased with successional age (0.034 to 0.006μg C mg-1Csoil h-1 from Site 1 to Site 4). A comparison of these respiratory properties with other ecosystems suggested that soil microorganisms in arctic soils have a high potential for decomposition when compared to those of other temperate ecosystems.

元の言語English
ページ(範囲)395-399
ページ数5
ジャーナルArctic, Antarctic, and Alpine Research
36
発行部数4
出版物ステータスPublished - 2004 11
外部発表Yes

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Glaciers
glaciers
microbial biomass
glacier
Biomass
respiration
Soils
biomass
soil
temperature
Temperature
Ecosystems
ecosystems
soil microorganisms
microbial activity
Norway
Arctic region
primary succession
soil sampling
SIR

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Environmental Chemistry

これを引用

Soil microbial biomass, respiration rate, and temperature dependence on a successional glacier foreland in Ny-Ålesund, Svalbard. / Bekku, Yukiko Sakata; Nakatsubo, Takayuki; Kume, Atsushi; Koizumi, Hiroshi.

:: Arctic, Antarctic, and Alpine Research, 巻 36, 番号 4, 11.2004, p. 395-399.

研究成果: Article

Bekku, Yukiko Sakata ; Nakatsubo, Takayuki ; Kume, Atsushi ; Koizumi, Hiroshi. / Soil microbial biomass, respiration rate, and temperature dependence on a successional glacier foreland in Ny-Ålesund, Svalbard. :: Arctic, Antarctic, and Alpine Research. 2004 ; 巻 36, 番号 4. pp. 395-399.
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