The Differentiation of Security Forces and the Onset of Genocidal Violence

Ulrich Pilster, Tobias Böhmelt, Atsushi Tago

研究成果: Article

6 引用 (Scopus)

抄録

Which factors drive the onset of genocidal violence? While the previous literature identified several important influences, states’ military capabilities for conducting mass-killings and the structure of their security forces have received surprisingly little attention so far. The authors take this shortcoming as a motivation for their research. A theoretical framework is developed, which argues that more differentiated security forces, that is, forces that are composed of a higher number of independent paramilitary and military organizations, are likely to act as a restraint factor in the process leading to state-sponsored mass-killings. Quantitative analyses support the argument for a sample of state-failure years for 1971–2003, and it is also shown that considering a state’s security force structure improves our ability to forecast genocides.

元の言語English
ページ(範囲)26-50
ページ数25
ジャーナルArmed Forces and Society
42
発行部数1
DOI
出版物ステータスPublished - 2016 1 1
外部発表Yes

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Safety Research

これを引用

The Differentiation of Security Forces and the Onset of Genocidal Violence. / Pilster, Ulrich; Böhmelt, Tobias; Tago, Atsushi.

:: Armed Forces and Society, 巻 42, 番号 1, 01.01.2016, p. 26-50.

研究成果: Article

Pilster, Ulrich ; Böhmelt, Tobias ; Tago, Atsushi. / The Differentiation of Security Forces and the Onset of Genocidal Violence. :: Armed Forces and Society. 2016 ; 巻 42, 番号 1. pp. 26-50.
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