Understanding consumer reactions to product contamination risks after national disasters

The roles of knowledge, experience, and information sources

Bjoern Christian Frank, Shane J. Schvaneveldt

研究成果: Article

4 引用 (Scopus)

抄録

This study shows that not all consumers intend to decrease purchases of potentially contaminated products after disasters; some rather intend to increase purchases. Purchase intent reductions derive from contamination risk knowledge, which depends on observed behavior of other consumers, objective media information, and past opposition to the technology causing contamination. Technology hazard expertise reinforces the effects of consumers' risk assessments and of past opposition to technology use. By contrast, purchase intent increases derive from empathy and salient social identity shared with disaster victims, which are triggered by affect-laden media exposure, past disaster-related experience, and disaster involvement of consumers' social networks.

元の言語English
ページ(範囲)199-208
ページ数10
ジャーナルJournal of Retailing and Consumer Services
28
DOI
出版物ステータスPublished - 2016 1 1
外部発表Yes

Fingerprint

Information sources
Disaster
Contamination
Purchase
Purchase intent
Media exposure
Empathy
Hazard
Consumer risk
Risk assessment
Expertise
Information media
Social identity
Technology use
Social networks

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Marketing

これを引用

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