X-ray emission properties of large-scale jets, hot spots, and lobes in active galactic nuclei

Jun Kataoka, Łukasz Stawarz

研究成果: Article

137 引用 (Scopus)

抄録

We examine a systematic comparison of jet knots, hot spots, and radio lobes recently observed with Chandra and ASCA. This report discusses the origin of their X-ray emissions and investigates the dynamics of the jets. The data were compiled at well-sampled radio (5 GHz) and X-ray (1 keV) frequencies for more than 40 radio galaxies. We examine three models for the X-ray production: synchrotron (SYN), synchrotron self-Compton (SSC), and external Compton (EC) on cosmic microwave background (CMB) photons. For the SYN sources - mostly jet knots in nearby low-luminosity radio galaxies - X-ray photons are produced by ultrarelativistic electrons with energies 10-100 TeV that must be accelerated in situ. For the other objects, conservatively classified as SSC or EC sources, a simple formulation of calculating the "expected" X-ray fluxes under an equipartition hypothesis is presented. We confirm that the observed X-ray fluxes are close to the expected ones for nonrelativistic emitting plasma velocities in the case of radio lobes and the majority of hot spots, whereas a considerable fraction of jet knots are too bright in X-rays to be explained in this way. We examine two possibilities to account for the discrepancy in a framework of the inverse Compton model: (1) the magnetic field is much smaller than the equipartition value, and (2) the jets are highly relativistic on kiloparsec and megaparsec scales. We conclude that if the inverse Compton model is the case, the X-ray-bright jet knots are most likely far from the minimum-power condition. We also briefly discuss the other possibility, namely, that the observed X-ray emission from all the jet knots is synchrotron in origin.

元の言語English
ページ(範囲)797-810
ページ数14
ジャーナルAstrophysical Journal
622
発行部数2 I
DOI
出版物ステータスPublished - 2005 4 1
外部発表Yes

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jet flow
active galactic nuclei
lobes
synchrotrons
x rays
radio
radio galaxies
photons
luminosity
magnetic field
formulations
plasma
microwaves
electron

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Space and Planetary Science

これを引用

X-ray emission properties of large-scale jets, hot spots, and lobes in active galactic nuclei. / Kataoka, Jun; Stawarz, Łukasz.

:: Astrophysical Journal, 巻 622, 番号 2 I, 01.04.2005, p. 797-810.

研究成果: Article

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N2 - We examine a systematic comparison of jet knots, hot spots, and radio lobes recently observed with Chandra and ASCA. This report discusses the origin of their X-ray emissions and investigates the dynamics of the jets. The data were compiled at well-sampled radio (5 GHz) and X-ray (1 keV) frequencies for more than 40 radio galaxies. We examine three models for the X-ray production: synchrotron (SYN), synchrotron self-Compton (SSC), and external Compton (EC) on cosmic microwave background (CMB) photons. For the SYN sources - mostly jet knots in nearby low-luminosity radio galaxies - X-ray photons are produced by ultrarelativistic electrons with energies 10-100 TeV that must be accelerated in situ. For the other objects, conservatively classified as SSC or EC sources, a simple formulation of calculating the "expected" X-ray fluxes under an equipartition hypothesis is presented. We confirm that the observed X-ray fluxes are close to the expected ones for nonrelativistic emitting plasma velocities in the case of radio lobes and the majority of hot spots, whereas a considerable fraction of jet knots are too bright in X-rays to be explained in this way. We examine two possibilities to account for the discrepancy in a framework of the inverse Compton model: (1) the magnetic field is much smaller than the equipartition value, and (2) the jets are highly relativistic on kiloparsec and megaparsec scales. We conclude that if the inverse Compton model is the case, the X-ray-bright jet knots are most likely far from the minimum-power condition. We also briefly discuss the other possibility, namely, that the observed X-ray emission from all the jet knots is synchrotron in origin.

AB - We examine a systematic comparison of jet knots, hot spots, and radio lobes recently observed with Chandra and ASCA. This report discusses the origin of their X-ray emissions and investigates the dynamics of the jets. The data were compiled at well-sampled radio (5 GHz) and X-ray (1 keV) frequencies for more than 40 radio galaxies. We examine three models for the X-ray production: synchrotron (SYN), synchrotron self-Compton (SSC), and external Compton (EC) on cosmic microwave background (CMB) photons. For the SYN sources - mostly jet knots in nearby low-luminosity radio galaxies - X-ray photons are produced by ultrarelativistic electrons with energies 10-100 TeV that must be accelerated in situ. For the other objects, conservatively classified as SSC or EC sources, a simple formulation of calculating the "expected" X-ray fluxes under an equipartition hypothesis is presented. We confirm that the observed X-ray fluxes are close to the expected ones for nonrelativistic emitting plasma velocities in the case of radio lobes and the majority of hot spots, whereas a considerable fraction of jet knots are too bright in X-rays to be explained in this way. We examine two possibilities to account for the discrepancy in a framework of the inverse Compton model: (1) the magnetic field is much smaller than the equipartition value, and (2) the jets are highly relativistic on kiloparsec and megaparsec scales. We conclude that if the inverse Compton model is the case, the X-ray-bright jet knots are most likely far from the minimum-power condition. We also briefly discuss the other possibility, namely, that the observed X-ray emission from all the jet knots is synchrotron in origin.

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KW - Magnetic fields

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KW - Radio continuum: galaxies

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